Fall In!

The Haverhill Marine Corps League, William Glynn Detachment, meetings are held in the basement of City Hall the first Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. Enter on the side near the Elks Lodge. 

Our next meeting is on Thursday December 2nd.

Directions to Haverhill City Hall

4 Summer St, Haverhill, MA 01830

Marine Corps Birthday Dinner Saturday, November 17th

The William D.Glynn Marine Corps League Detachment is having a dinner to celebrate the 237th Matine Corps Birthday.

On Saturday November 17th at Marias Resturant, 81 Essex St, Haverhill Mass.

http://www.thegalleriabanquetroom.com/

Tickets are $30 per person.  Call now to reserve a table for you and your guests.

For information and tickets please call:

Richard Broadnax 978-372-9441

Angelo Riva 978-914-6076

Richard Borghi 978-809-8036

 

Toys for Tots Certificate of Appreciation Presented

On Christmas eve the Marines from the Glynn Detachment presented John Edmunds with a Certificate of Appreciation for his support of the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots Program.

John Edmunds recieves certificate from Tom Rudden and Dave Tuttle

Each Year the Edmunds family puts on a Christmas light show and collects toys for the Toys for Tots program

 

 

Honoring our Spanish American War Veterans

Members of the Captain William D. Glynn Detachment No. 128 of the Marine Corps League of Haverhill salute as taps are played as a new flagpole is dedicated in the section where Spanish American War veterans are buried at Elmwood Cemetery on Tuesday, Nov. 10.
http://www.hgazette.com/homepage/images_sizedimage_316115807/resources_photoview

 

 

Armed Forces Day at Fort Devens May 16th

On Saturday May 16th Detachment Commandant Dick Broadnax and Jr Vice Comdt  Tom Rudden attended the Armed Forces Day event at Fort Devens .
When we arrived there we found the event in full swing.   There were several bands that played from the bandstand. Everything from Country, Oldies, Rock.  In front of the bandstand  there were picnic tables to sit and listen to the music or to have lunch.

The food service provided was excellent. The Hotdogs  Burgers and Ribs were served by a great bunch from the Texas Road House.

 

During lunch we had a chance to talk with a World War II vet who arrived in his D-Day uniform. 

 

Later we toured the static displays of trucks and a Coast Guard boat.  There were several tents hosting everything from  fresh honey with a cage full of live honey bees,  American Legion,  The USO and a shop selling hats bumper stickers and pins.

 

We had a great time talking with the Marine Recruiters there.  They had a portable pull-up bar.  We were able to get away with a few Marine Corps stickers and Dick got him a nice USMC baseball cap just for knowing Chesty Puller.

There was a group of remote controlled airplanes flying and one of the aircraft was a replica of a WWII British Spitfire with D-Day Markings.

The Coast Guard had one of their patrol boats on display.

The Army had a great display of rifles from several eras.  They had an M-1, an AK-47,  A Japanese sniper rifle and a fighting knife used by one of Rogers Raiders during the war in the Pacific. Very exciting to hold a piece of history in your hand.

There was  a group of WWII vehicles on display from the Rhode Island Military Vehicle Collectors Club on display.  While admiring the trucks and Jeeps we bumped into Chief Jones.  The Chief entered the Marine Corps  back in 1946. He trained at Montford point.  Back then the Corps was not integrated and black marines trained separately.  Later he joined the Army and became a crew chief on Huey’s.  We spent about an hour and a half talking with Chief Jones. Truly a living legend. There are only a few Montford Point Marines left.

 

Iwo Jima Day Boston

On Thursday February 19th the detachment participated in the Massachusetts State Iwo Jima Day Memorial Service in Boston.    We mustered in front of the Samuel Adams Statue in Faneuil Hall at 10:30am.  By 11:30 we began to march to the State House for the memorial service.  The route started on Congress Street at Faneuil Hall and turned right onto Court Street where we passed the New England Shelter for Homeless Veterans.  The Parade turned left on to Tremont Street and proceeded towards the Boston Common where we turned right, marched up Park Street and then left again onto Beacon Street where the parade fell into formation in front of the State House. Outside the state house there was  a memorial ceremony  with a gun salute of three volleys and then taps.

Following the parade we were invited into the State House to participate in a service honoring the Veterans’ of the Iwo Jima invasion on the 64th anniversary of the landings.

After many speeches and a few awards there was a nice lunch provided followed by two giant sheet cakes decorated with the Marine Corps emblem and a depiction of the flag raising on Iwo Jima.

 

 

Marching towards the Boston Common along Tremont Street

Marching towards the Boston Common along Tremont Street

 

 

 

Pearl Harbor Day Memorial Service

On Sunday December 7th, Richard Broadnax and Tom Rudden attended a Pearl Harbor Memorial service at the USS Constitution.  Starting at 12:00 we heard from Pearl Harbor Survivor   Don Tabbut.  Along with Richard and  Tom, there was a strong showing of Marines from the Metro West Marine Corps League Detachment  After a short service indoors we walked down to the USS Cassin Young  where  two memorial wreaths were tossed from the fan tail.

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After the service we were fortunate to commandeer a LT from the USS Freedom. 

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The USS Freedom is docked to the aft of the USS Constitution for the weekend.  The LT took the # of us on a VIP tour of the Ship.  Very impressive ship.

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 It was really good to see new technology being leveraged in a very innovative and smart way.

 

 

From the Navy News Service:

Freedom Remembers Pearl Harbor in Boston
Story Number: NNS081211-35
12/11/2008

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Kenneth R. Hendrix, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Public Affairs

BOSTON (NNS) — Sailors from the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) attended a Pearl Harbor memorial ceremony held at the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston, led by the Pearl Harbor Survivors and Friends Freedom Trail Chapter Dec. 7.

Since that terrible morning 67 years ago, the survivors of the attack on Pearl Harbor have been called heroes, the greatest generation and the first American witnesses to an event that caused America to enter World War II.

Retired Radioman 1st Class Don Tabbut, the only survivor in attendance, shared his experience and the ordeals of that dreadful day at the Navy yard visitor center before going to the fantail of a World War II destroyer Cassin Young.

“We know a lot of Americans have become complacent feeling that with huge oceans at our sides we shouldn’t worry about what was happening in foreign lands. They thought that others could not hurt us, but the attacks on Pearl Harbor showed otherwise,” Tabbut said. “This is why we survivors have been trying so long to get people to realize the possible problems we could face and to keep our military forces strong.”

After Tabbut’s speech, crowd goers made their way to the destroyer where Freedom’s Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Don Gaberielson, took part in the ritual of throwing a wreath into Boston Harbor in remembrance of those who lost their lives Dec. 7, 1941.

Freedom’s Command Senior Chief (SW) Thomas Dunning said it was important to be part of the ceremony.

“I salute those who were there during Pearl Harbor, and in return we should be there for them just has they are here for us today,” Dunning said.

Chief Engineman (SW) Corbin Stalcup, who was also in attendance, commented about the service as being something American citizens should always bear in mind and never overlook because it was major turning point in the nation’s history.

“It was one of our darkest hours, but what came at the end of the war and how we turned around Pearl Harbor to signing a peace treaty on the Missouri is something we should remember and never forget,” Stalcup said.

Once the observance was over, Tabbut said he is determined in making the Pearl Harbor remembrance a pilgrimage for as long as he can. He is currently 84.

“Remember Pearl Harbor,” Tabbut said. “For me to be here again to do this ceremony, it makes me feel good inside.”